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SLSA MEMBERS COLLABORATE ON RESEARCH PROJECTS AWARDED MAJOR GRANTS

Max headshot from Endeavors-1b57350930797a7cdd57d4bb522af56cSLSA members are working on projects that have received major grant funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Max Krochmal, Assistant Professor of History at Texas Christian University, leads the “Civil Rights in Black and Brownphoto_greeneproject, which received a 2015 Collaborative Research Grant from the NEH.  Julie Greene, Professor of History at the University of Maryland, is a collaborator on the project “Synergies among Digital Humanities and African American History and Culture,” which will be funded by the Mellon Foundation.

Read more about the awards here:
Civil Rights History Project Gets $200,000 Grant
$1.25 Million Mellon Grant Awarded to UMD’s Arts and Humanities College

“WORKING HISTORY” EPISODE FOCUSES ON TOBACCO FARMING AND FEDERAL FARM POLICY

SLSA_PodcastLogo.v2A new episode of SLSA’s “Working History” podcast is available for listening. In “Tobacco, Family Farms, and Federal Policy,” SLSA Treasurer, Professor Evan Bennett of Florida Atlantic University, discusses his book When Tobacco Was King and the development and demise of family tobacco farms in the Piedmont South, tobacco farming culture, and the New Deal’s Federal Tobacco Program.

Former SLSA President Jennifer Brooks of Auburn University will guest host the next episode featuring a discussion of immigrant rights and immigration policy with grassroots organizer Anton Flores. Follow the podcast on SoundCloud and subscribe on iTunes to keep up to date on future episodes!

SLSA-OSSECS LUNCHEON AT THE 2015 SOUTHERN HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION ANNUAL MEETING

nelson_sThe annual joint luncheon of the Southern Labor Studies Association and the Organization for the Study of Southern Economy, Culture and Society will be held on Saturday, November 14, 2015, from 11:45 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Southern Historical Association Annual Meeting in Little Rock, Arkansas. Scott Nelson, Legum Professor of History at the College of William & Mary and SLSA’s immediate past president, will deliver the keynote address, “The White Whale: Why Moby Dick Is a Story about the Fate of Southern Labor in the Age of Slavery.”

Tickets for the 2015 luncheon may be purchased for $25 from SLSA Treasurer, Evan P. Bennett, Department of History, Florida Atlanta University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431. The deadline for purchasing tickets is October 30, 2015.

JOSEPH CRESPINO ANALYZES HARPER LEE’S GO SET A WATCHMAN IN NEW YORK TIMES EDITORIAL

crespino_josephSLSA member Joseph Crespino argues Harper Lee’s recently released novel, Go Set a Watchman, “offers a subtle and surprising exploration of racial politics, and not merely because of the racist comments of Atticus Finch, one of the most beloved figures in American literature,” in a recent New York Times op-ed. The editorial, “Atticus Finch Offers a Lesson in Southern Politics,” is available via the New York Times online.

Joseph Crespino is the Jimmy Carter Professor of 20th century American political history and Southern history since Reconstruction. He is the author of Strom Thurmond’s America, In Search of Another Country: Mississippi and the Conservative Counterrevolution, and co-editor, with Matthew Lassiter, of The Myth of Southern Exceptionalism.

“WORKING HISTORY” EPISODE FOCUSES ON THE LABOR QUESTION AND HIGHER EDUCATION

SLSA_PodcastLogo.v2The second installment of the SLSA “Working History” podcast is available for listening. In “The Labor Question and Higher Education,” Professor Elizabeth (Ellie) Shermer of Loyola University Chicago explores the impacts of corporate influence and the politics shaping higher education, past and present.

SLSA Treasurer Professor Evan Bennett of Florida Atlantic University will discuss his book When Tobacco Was King on the next episode. Follow the podcast on SoundCloud and subscribe on iTunes to keep up to date on future episodes!

NEW BOOK EDITED BY AND INCLUDES CONTRIBUTIONS FROM SLSA MEMBERS

9781479856220_FullA new book, Making the Empire Work: Labor and United States Imperialism, co-edited by SLSA member Jana Lipman and Daniel Bender is now available from NYU Press.

Described by Professor David Roediger as an “exciting and innovative work,” Professor Nan Enstad calls Making the Empire Work “a game changer.” NYU Press notes that by “[p]lacing working men and women at the center of the long history of the U.S. empire, these essays offer new stories of empire that intersect with the ‘grand narratives’ of diplomatic affairs at the national and international levels. … This collection challenges historians to consider the labor that formed, worked, confronted, and rendered the U.S. empire visible. The U.S. empire is a project of global labor mobilization, coercive management, military presence, and forced cultural encounter. Together, the essays in this volume recognize the United States as a global imperial player whose systems of labor mobilization and migration stretched from Central America to West Africa to the United States itself. Workers are also the key actors in this volume. … When historians place labor and working people at the center, empire appears as a central dynamic of U.S. history.”

SLSA LAUNCHES “WORKING HISTORY” PODCAST

SLSA_PodcastLogo.v2The first podcast in the SLSA “Working History” series is now available for listening on iTunes and SoundCloud. In this episode, SLSA Executive Board member and Hood College Assistant Professor Jay Driskell discusses his book, Schooling Jim Crow, in which he traces the roots of black protest politics to early 20th century Atlanta and the fight for equal education. To keep up to date on future episodes, subscribe to Working History on iTunes and follow on SoundCloud.

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